Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Pull My Daisy (1959)

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4168951954232139752&hl=en#


Pull My Daisy
26:11 - 1 year ago
A short 1959 film that typifies the "Beat Generation". Directed by Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie, Daisy was adapted by Jack Kerouac from the third act of a never-completed stage play entitled Beat Generation. Kerouac also provided improvised narration. It starred Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Larry Rivers, Peter Orlovsky, David Amram, Richard Bellamy, Alice Neel, Sally Gross, Delphine Seyrig and Pablo Frank, Robert Frank's then-infant son. Based on an incident in the life of Neal Cassady and his wife Carolyn, Daisy tells the story of a railway brakeman whose painter wife invites a respectable bishop over for dinner. However, the brakeman's bohemian friends crash the party, with comic results. Originally intended to be called "The Beat Generation" the title "Pull My Daisy" was taken from the poem of the same name written by Kerouac, Ginsberg and Neal Cassady over the 40's and 50's. Part of the original poem was used as a lyric in David Amram's jazz composition that opens the film. SUBTERRANEAN CINEMA http://subcin.com THE SUBTERRANEAN COLLECTION http://subcin.com/subvid.html«

TO VIEW ON UBUWEB: http://ubu.com/film/leslie_daisy.html
 Alfred Leslie & Robert Frank- Pull My Daisy (1959)


A short film that typifies the Beat Generation. Directed by Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie, Daisy was adapted by Jack Kerouac from the third act of a stage play he never finished entitled Beat Generation. Kerouac also provided improvised narration. It starred Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Larry Rivers, Peter Orlovsky, David Amram, Richard Bellamy, Alice Neel, Sally Gross and Pablo Frank, Robert Frank's then-infant son.

Based on an incident in the life of Neal Cassady and his wife Carolyn, Daisy tells the story of a railway brakeman whose painter wife invites a respectable bishop over for dinner. However, the brakeman's bohemian friends crash the party, with comic results.

The Beat philosophy emphasized spontaneity, and the film conveyed the quality of having been thrown together or even improvised. Pull My Daisy was accordingly praised for years as an improvisational masterpiece, until Leslie revealed in a November 28, 1968 article in the Village Voice that the film was actually carefully planned, rehearsed, and directed by him and Frank, who shot the film on a professionally lit studio set.

Pull My Daisy has been deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. -- Wikipedia 

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Dear tex

thanks for posting "Pull my Daisy'

After 30 years of being unavailable, it is nice to see it everywhere FOR FREE

since Kerouac and i never got paid , glad to see it out there since we did it for FUN, never dreaming so many people would be interested in seeing it 51 years later!

I sing the song "Pull My Daisy" every time i play Kerrville or Austin.

For my 80th birthday, El Paso Symphony is [laying my saxophone concerto "Ode to Lord Buckley"
next November.

Hope to get there to hear it.

Drive friendly,font mess with Texas and remember.,,.......EVERYBODY IS SOMEBODY IN LUCKENBACH!!

David Amram
www.davidamram.com
Best YouTube selections
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=DE566F6F01A2403A